okamimythology:

Princess Fuse, or Fusehime, comes not from mythology but from an epic novel written by Kyokutei Bakin from 1814-1842, which he wrote to compete with the great Chinese novel Water Margin. The title, Nansô Satomi Hakkenden, translates to “Legend of the Eight Dog Heroes of the Satomi Clan of…




god-of-heavens-light:


{x}

“You are there, aren’t you? I just can’t see… We all miss you, the villagers, the Canine Warriors and myself. Yatsu— I miss you, so dearly.”
“Please let me hold you again.”

god-of-heavens-light:

{x}

“You are there, aren’t you? I just can’t see… We all miss you, the villagers, the Canine Warriors and myself. Yatsu— I miss you, so dearly.”

“Please let me hold you again.”



okamimythology:

Remember the story of Happyaku Bikuni (from my last post on Rao)? In one version, as the nun travels around, she plants camellia trees wherever she goes. Called tsubaki in Japanese, these trees have lovely flowers and are used to make tea.

Camille and Camellia’s ancestors, Peony and Peoni, did just this. 

D’you live around here, wolf? We decided we wanted to plant a Guardian Tree in Nippon. So we set off on a trip with the seedlings of this Konohana tree. The Konohana tree’s revered as a sacred guardian where we’re from. Wherever it grows, happiness grows with it. And we heard Nippon was a place of sadness, so… I’ll be so happy if our Konohana tree helps even a bit. And the air in this village is so clean and pure. I’m sure it’ll grow into a beautiful, big tree.

I’m not sure of the specific symbolism of Peony/Peoni’s name, but peonies are popular in Asian art, and “white peony” is one of the most famous Chinese teas. But even though they planted peach trees rather than camellias, Camille and Camellia’s names are obvious throwbacks to the Happyaku Bikuni legend.